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Revell ’29 Ford Model A Roadster 2’n 1

RELATED TOPICS: REVELL | FORD | MODEL A | ROADSTER
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Kit No.: 85-4463
Scale: 1/25
Mfr.: Revell, revell.com
Price: $26.95
Comments: Injection-molded parts (white, clear, chrome plated); four vinyl tires; decals
Pros: Hotly anticipated subject; clean molds; good detail
Cons: Whitewall decals a bit fussy; minor fit issues
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This is the second time Revell has released its hotly anticipated Ford Model A Roadster. Superb molding throughout, the detailed parts exhibit no sink marks or flash of any kind, and the kit offers you one of two possible builds: a highboy or channeled body.

Options for the Chevy small-block V8 include either a three-carb setup or a blower. The kit also provides two types of rims: 1940 Ford

Deluxe rims and hub caps or chrome Hildebrandts.

Not surprisingly, the Roadster shares a lot with the 1930 Ford coupe Revell released a couple of years ago, such as the frame, front and rear suspensions, floor pan, fuel cell, battery, and the Chevy engine.

For me, it was a traditional highboy with the carbs and Deluxe rims and hubs all the way.

Knowing that the Roaster could be built two different ways, I went through the instructions and checked which pieces went with each option. Helpfully, the instructions clearly mark both the highboy (A) and channeled (B) variants. Then I weeded out parts I didn’t need to minimize confusion. 

The step-by-step detailed instructions and nearly flawless parts made the kit a dream to build. The one hiccup I encountered was fitting the chassis to the body. While test-fitting, I encountered a gap between the frame and chassis that I couldn’t fix by puzzling them together. In the end, I filed down the mounting points on the crossmember (Part 142), frame (Part 70), and floor pan (Part 62).

This alteration fixed the gap and provided a more realistic appearance.

Revell’s decal sheet gives you many options for dressing up your street rod. But because I went with a more traditional look, I decided on the authentic-looking pinstripes for the trunk, doors, and the cowl in front of the windshield. All the color-rich decals settled nicely over gloss.

However, placing the whitewall decals on the tires proved more challenging. The complex shape of the tire and the vinyl material itself requires patience. Setting solution is also a must. I would have preferred pad-printed tires, but I got through it with worthy results.

I stepped out a little on this review model and added some wires to the engine as a finishing touch — unusual, I know. But I wanted to show you that the model, as it comes in the box, lends itself to a gussying up. Just a little extra modeling effort and you can have an outstanding model; an out-of-the-box build will allow you to have an excellent addition to your collection.

As an avid street-rod builder, I really enjoyed working on Revell’s 1929 Roadster. The minor issues are nothing a little modeling knowhow can’t overcome. I highly recommend it, and you should go out and get one. You know what, buy two: It is a 2’n 1 kit after all.


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